Business

London Underground workers have voted to strike again, as they near the end of this week’s action which has seen tube services disrupted across the capital.

Around 10,000 London Underground staff refused to work this week – with all tube lines affected.

More than 90% of Rail, Maritime and Transport union members who voted decided to withdraw their labour in the coming months, according to the union.

Workers say they are campaigning to protect their pensions, improve working conditions, and prevent job losses.

A date for the next strike has yet to be set.

Transport for London (TfL) have announced plans to cut 600 jobs and reform the pension scheme that Mayor Sadiq Khan has described as “generous”.

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Union boss says that planned strike action will pause after first round is complete, pending developments, as a notice period is required for any further action to take place.

“This is a fantastic result for our members and proves that the arguments RMT has been making is endorsed by tube workers,” said RMT general secretary Mick Lynch.

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“TfL and the Mayor of London need to seriously rethink their plans for hundreds of job cuts and trying to take hard-earned pensions from workers who serve the people of London on a daily basis,” Mr Lynch added. “He should not be trying to sacrifice our members’ pensions and jobs to fit within budget restraints laid down by Boris Johnson.”

This week has seen a wave of strike action across the country’s railways and London’s underground service.

It is expected to be followed by disruption at key airports, including London Heathrow, after British Airways workers voted on Thursday to strike during the peak summer holiday season as they demand a return to their pre-pandemic salaries.

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